The Campaign to End Obesity


 
Today, two-thirds of U.S. adults and nearly one in three children struggle because they are overweight or have obesity. The effects of the nation’s obesity epidemic are immense: taxpayers, businesses, communities and individuals spend hundreds of billions of dollars each year due to obesity, including nearly $200 billion in medical costs. Obesity is the reason that the current generation of youth is predicted to live a shorter life than their parents. 

Much can be done to reverse the epidemic, yet important opportunities to tackle obesity at the national policy level -- including changes that enable more Americans to eat healthy and be active, as well as those that provide appropriate medical treatment for patients -- have gone largely unmet. The Campaign works to fill this gap. By bringing together leaders from across industry, academia and public health with policymakers and their advisors, the Campaign provides the information and guidance that decision-makers need to make policy changes that will reverse one of the nation’s costliest and most prevalent diseases.

  


The Campaign to End Obesity
Americans Are Finally Eating Less
The New York Times, 07.24.15
After decades of worsening diets and sharp increases in obesity, Americans’ eating habits have begun changing for the better. Calories consumed daily by the typical American adult, which peaked around 2003, are in the midst of their first sustained decline since federal statistics began to track the subject, more than 40 years ago. The number of calories that the average American child takes in daily has fallen even more — by at least 9 percent.
Time to address obesity as a priority for Medicare
The Hill, 07.23.15
Executive Director and Chief Executive Officer of the Gerontological Society of America James Appleby, BPharm, MPH, wrote the following piece for the The Hill's Congress blog: When we think of the health problems that tend to affect us in our senior years, arthritis immediately comes to mind. So do cognitive disorders, such as dementia or Alzheimer’s disease. And, of course, there is a greater likelihood of the need for joint replacements as we get older.
Newspapers can predict obesity so don’t say we never did anything for you
The Washington Post, 07.22.15
If you're looking for a way to predict future obesity trends, maybe you should buy a newspaper. I promise this post is not just a lame attempt to keep my profession afloat. It's not! There was a real study to back me up here. That study, published in the journal BMC Public Health, looked at two media outlets — the New York Times and the Times of London — and found that in both newspapers, mentions of food might be indicators of how a nation's obesity level is trending.
Study: Probability of Obese People Reaching ‘Normal’ Weight Less Than 1%
CBS News, 07.20.15
WASHINGTON — Despite the fact that the diet industry does several billion dollars worth of business in the U.S. alone each year, a new study published in the American Journal of Public Health suggests that most obese people will never achieve a “normal” weight.
Engineering student combines gaming, Fitbit tech to address childhood obesity
ASU News, 07.06.15
A self-proclaimed hippie from Boulder, Colorado, ASU student Courtney Van Bussum is a locavore and at her happiest when hiking, perusing farmers markets, or practicing and teaching yoga as a certified yoga instructor. “The general consensus in Boulder, Colorado, is that if you aren’t outside hiking or inside doing yoga, you’re probably doing something wrong,” said Van Bussum who will be a junior in the fall, majoring in biomedical engineering at Arizona State University’s Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering within Barrett, The Honors College.
More news



New Release: The New Markets Tax Credit: Opportunities for Investment
in Healthy Foods and Physical Activity



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CBO Scoring Misses Billions of Dollars in Potential Long-Term Savings from Effective Obesity Prevention Policies


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To learn more about changes in federal policy that will enable more Americans to eat healthy and be active, as well as those that provide appropriate medical treatment for patients, visit the Campaign to End Obesity Action Fund's website by clicking here.  




* In 2010, the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office reported that nearly 20 percent of the increase in U.S. health care spending (from 1987‐2007) was caused by obesity.

* The annual health costs related to obesity in the U.S. are nearly $200 billion, and nearly 21 percent of U.S. medical costs can be attributed on obesity, according to research released by the National Bureau of Economic Research.


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