The Campaign to End Obesity


 
Today, two-thirds of U.S. adults and nearly one in three children struggle because they are overweight or have obesity. The effects of the nation’s obesity epidemic are immense: taxpayers, businesses, communities and individuals spend hundreds of billions of dollars each year due to obesity, including nearly $200 billion in medical costs. Obesity is the reason that the current generation of youth is predicted to live a shorter life than their parents. 

Much can be done to reverse the epidemic, yet important opportunities to tackle obesity at the national policy level -- including changes that enable more Americans to eat healthy and be active, as well as those that provide appropriate medical treatment for patients -- have gone largely unmet. The Campaign works to fill this gap. By bringing together leaders from across industry, academia and public health with policymakers and their advisors, the Campaign provides the information and guidance that decision-makers need to make policy changes that will reverse one of the nation’s costliest and most prevalent diseases.

  


The Campaign to End Obesity
FDA Memo Urges Reset of Nutrition Goals
Politico, 08.10.16
It’s not enough for FDA to give consumers the information they need to make healthy choices; the agency should go a step further and aim for its policies to actually result in healthier Americans, suggests an internal FDA memo obtained by POLITICO. The 98-page report — the culmination of a year-long assessment known as “The Nutrition Review Project”— offers a rare window into FDA’s thinking on hot-button issues, ranging from sodium to front-of-pack labeling. FDA leaders argue in the memo that reorienting the agency’s nutrition work could save billions in health care costs — far more savings than the agency’s current push to overhaul food safety is projected to deliver.
Diet from Design: How City Planning Can Prevent Obesity
Forbes, 08.09.16
The prevalence of obesity in developed nations is a well-documented phenomenon. But, perhaps surprisingly, obesity rates have also been rising in developing economies. Initiatives to curb obesity are plentiful, but a strategy based in the discipline of city planning merits particular attention, especially in rapidly developing environments where the most impact could be made.
Task Force Calls for More Study Into Risks, Benefits of Kids' Cholesterol Screening
HealthDay, 08.09.16
There's not enough evidence to determine the potential benefits or risks of screening for high cholesterol in children and teens without symptoms, signs or a known diagnosis, experts say. For that reason, no recommendation can be made for or against such screening, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) said in a statement released Aug. 9.
Spooked By Obesity Trends, the U.S. Military is Redefining Its Basic Fitness Standards
Military Times, 08.07.16
For the first time in 14 years, the military is rewriting its body composition standards and the methods used to determine whether troops are too fat to serve.
Doctors Not Taught to Discuss Diet, Nutrition with Patients
Chicago Tribune, 08.01.16
Good diet and nutrition can put you on a path to health and wellness, but it's unusual to find doctors who are trained well enough and can spend the time required to have this conversation with patients. In the United States, the traditional medical approach has been to focus on treatment rather than prevention of disease and illness. Jennifer Trilk, assistant professor in the department of biomedical science at the University of South Carolina School of Medicine at Greenville and a leader in the new lifestyle medicine movement, says that as we've developed more and more ways to intervene, most doctors are still more comfortable treating illnesses than addressing prevention.
Neighborhoods Matter to Kids' Food Choices
MedPage Today, 06.23.16
Children who went near places that sold junk food between home and school were more likely to end up purchasing that junk food, according to a new study that used global positioning system (GPS) technology to track kids' trips for 2 weeks.
More news



New Release: The New Markets Tax Credit: Opportunities for Investment
in Healthy Foods and Physical Activity



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CBO Scoring Misses Billions of Dollars in Potential Long-Term Savings from Effective Obesity Prevention Policies


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To learn more about changes in federal policy that will enable more Americans to eat healthy and be active, as well as those that provide appropriate medical treatment for patients, visit the Campaign to End Obesity Action Fund's website by clicking here.  




* In 2010, the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office reported that nearly 20 percent of the increase in U.S. health care spending (from 1987‐2007) was caused by obesity.

* The annual health costs related to obesity in the U.S. are nearly $200 billion, and nearly 21 percent of U.S. medical costs can be attributed on obesity, according to research released by the National Bureau of Economic Research.


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