The Campaign to End Obesity


 
Today, two-thirds of U.S. adults and nearly one in three children struggle because they are overweight or have obesity. The effects of the nation’s obesity epidemic are immense: taxpayers, businesses, communities and individuals spend hundreds of billions of dollars each year due to obesity, including nearly $200 billion in medical costs. Obesity is the reason that the current generation of youth is predicted to live a shorter life than their parents. 

Much can be done to reverse the epidemic, yet important opportunities to tackle obesity at the national policy level -- including changes that enable more Americans to eat healthy and be active, as well as those that provide appropriate medical treatment for patients -- have gone largely unmet. The Campaign works to fill this gap. By bringing together leaders from across industry, academia and public health with policymakers and their advisors, the Campaign provides the information and guidance that decision-makers need to make policy changes that will reverse one of the nation’s costliest and most prevalent diseases.

  


The Campaign to End Obesity
Obama's Plan to Give Free Lunches to Millions More Kids
The Washington Post, 01.27.16
The Obama administration will announce new plans Wednesday to launch a pilot program aimed at increasing poor children's access to food through the National School Lunch Program. The pilot program will allow participating states to use Medicaid data to automatically certify students for free and reduced-price school lunches. Currently, families have to submit an application — a laborious process for parents and a costly one for schools — even when they have already proven that they are income-eligible through their participation in other government assistance programs.
Finally, More Doctors are Specializing in Obesity Treatment
Forbes, 02.01.16
At long last, more full-fledged doctors who actually specialize in obesity treatment are arriving. For years, the medical profession has been churning out doctors super specializing in areas that exceeded demand (for example, how many radiologists do we really need?) and at the same time neglecting areas that have real need…such as obesity treatment. Last I checked, an obesity epidemic has been gripping the world, but there’s been no similar epidemic of X-rays that need to be read. If you don’t know already, obesity is a major problem, resulting in many different physical, psychological, social and economic problems, including chronic conditions such as hypertension, diabetes, heart disease and cancer, lost productivity for businesses, and soaring healthcare costs. Based on television shows such as The Biggest Loser and myriad diet and exercise products and programs that blanket television, the internet and magazines, people are calling out for help to manage their weight and treat obesity. So (queue the song “Flight of the Valkyries”) last week, the still relatively new American Board of Obesity Medicine (ABOM) certified more than 400 physicians as obesity medicine specialists.
Ending Childhood Obesity is a Global Challenge
Newsweek, 01.30.16
Childhood obesity is no longer the preserve of wealthy nations. There are more overweight and obese children in the developing world, in terms of absolute numbers, and an upward trend is evident. In Africa alone, the number of overweight children under five years of age nearly doubled from 5.4 million to 10.3 million between 1990 and 2014. Current estimates of 41 million overweight and obese children under five globally represents only the tip of the iceberg—we do not yet have figures available for older children and adolescents. The situation is exacerbated if we factor in the number of children who are heading towards obesity but have not yet reached the standard cut-off.
Glimmer of Hope for the Obesity Crisis?
Forbes, 01.29.16
Acceptance of being overweight is greater today than in 2010 as Americans increasingly see themselves primarily responsible for their own weight, although belief in the role of genetic predisposition is significant and growing. A new report finds people are beginning to connect the dots between eating behaviors and personal health.
Obama to Seek $12B From Congress for Child Nutrition
ABC News, 01.27.16
President Barack Obama plans to ask Congress for $12 billion over a decade to help feed schoolchildren from low-income families during the summer, the White House said Wednesday. The request will be in the 2017 budget proposal Obama plans to send lawmakers on Feb. 9.
More news



New Release: The New Markets Tax Credit: Opportunities for Investment
in Healthy Foods and Physical Activity



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CBO Scoring Misses Billions of Dollars in Potential Long-Term Savings from Effective Obesity Prevention Policies


Click here for additional information.




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To learn more about changes in federal policy that will enable more Americans to eat healthy and be active, as well as those that provide appropriate medical treatment for patients, visit the Campaign to End Obesity Action Fund's website by clicking here.  




* In 2010, the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office reported that nearly 20 percent of the increase in U.S. health care spending (from 1987‐2007) was caused by obesity.

* The annual health costs related to obesity in the U.S. are nearly $200 billion, and nearly 21 percent of U.S. medical costs can be attributed on obesity, according to research released by the National Bureau of Economic Research.


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